RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF FOUR MUSCLE GROUPS FOR INDOOR ROCK CLIMBING PERFORMANCE

Posted: 08-15-2015

I am proud to have participated as a research assistant and co-author with my friend and former UNM climbing team member, Mike Deyhle, in pursuit of his University of New Mexico Exercise Physiology Masters Thesis study paper titled: ‘RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF FOUR MUSCLE GROUPS FOR INDOOR ROCK CLIMBING PERFORMANCE’, published in The Journal Of Strength And Conditioning Research – VOLUME 29 | NUMBER 7 | JULY 2015 |

This is the 4th indoor climbing sport-specific performance study in North America in which I have been involved, having served on the first 3 studies as an athlete study subject. The other studies in which I participated were private (non-published) competition climbing training periodization based pilot studies with my coaches and trainers in France while I was competing on the bouldering World Cup Circuit. I have also co-authored training articles published in climbing periodicals with Chris Wall, MS – Exercise Physiology. However, this is the first time that I have been invited to participate as a non-academic independent consultant on the research side of a study. I learned a tremendous amount about research processes as my responsibility was to help create a pertinent experimental methodology that relates to the sport of artificial climbing. I helped establish a procedure for the familiarization of study subjects as well as a consistent means of administering the climbing movement based stress test that isolated the targeted pre-fatigued muscle groups.

I thoroughly enjoyed challenging and applying my knowledge of sport-specific indoor climbing training and movement to this project. It was a pleasure collaborating with the research team, especially Mike’s advisor, Christine Mermier PhD, for whom I had previously served as an athlete study subject on both her Masters Thesis and PhD Dissertation research projects many years ago. I hope to continue contributing my experience and learning more about exercise physiology research in the future. Although the study revealed more questions than it answered, I hope that it will serve to further our understanding (or at least provoke and motivate us to more deeply understand) the physiologic performance aspects of the sport of indoor artificial climbing as a legitimate athletic activity and exercise modality.

Mike is currently pursuing his PhD in Exercise Physiology at the University of Utah in SLC, UT. His inquiry is focused on the area of cellular level muscle energy systems – so stay tuned for some more interesting discoveries. Thanks for making it possible for me to finally get published Mike and Christine!

Review the paper and feel free to send us your insights and feedback.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD ARTICLE: RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF FOUR MUSCLE GROUPS FOR INDOOR ROCK CLIMBING PERFORMANCE, 2015.pdf

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